Aimee

Aimee 2 1

Introduction by Kimani

Kimani, a US college student who is originally from Kenya

To read the Migration Map story of Kimani click here.

Aimee’s parents, fled their native country, Rwanda in 1994, because of the infamous Rwandan genocide. They fled on foot through war torn Democratic Republic of Congo and to a refugee camp in the Republic of Congo, where I was born, where Aimee was born.

Raised by her single mother, after a divorce, Aimee did not let this circumstance bring her down, she promised her mother, “I will never give up my goal to purse my dream to make you happy.”

Aimee and her family, immigrated to the US; the land of opportunity, in 2013.

Being in the US has inspired Aimee to go to college and to seize the opportunities that the US has offered her. She travelled to Flint, Michigan, to help the community of Flint that has been facing an unprecedented water emergency. She was working with a company called Forge Flint that started to provide safe, clean water to the community of Flint.

Aimee is currently a freshman at Northwest University, Seattle and would love to be a caseworker.

Kimani’s interview with Aimee

Aimee, a US college student who is originally from Congo

Aimee, where are you from, and when did you get to the United States?

I come from a family of four boys.

My parents fled their native country, Rwanda in 1994, because of a genocide. They fled on foot through war torn Democratic Republic of Congo and to a refugee camp in the Republic of Congo, where I was born. As a refugee, finding the means to education has always been a struggle.

My family did not have enough money to afford all the supplies I needed for my classes and I had a hard time catching up with other students, but that did not stop me from going to school.

Genocide refugees from Rwanda, like Aimee’s parents, in 1994

My refugee parents fled their native country, Rwanda in 1994

In 2005, my parents divorced, despite this tragedy, my mother continued to support all her five children to achieve their dreams. It was then that I made a promise to her:

“I will never give up on my goal to pursue my dream and to make you happy.”

But my journey wasn’t over. In 2013, my mother again packed up the family to come to the USA. After years of fear and instability, we were excited to come to this land of opportunity that we can now call home. Here we have started a new life — though it has not been easy.

Coming from a country where most people live in poor conditions because of a lack of opportunities, it inspired me to go to college to achieve my dream. Back in Congo, even though my family did not have money, I used to save up money so I could provide food for my neighbors in need.

Refugees like Aimee’s parents, fleeing through war torn Congo

My parents fled through war torn Congo, where I was born

Education has also provided new work and service opportunities.

This summer I went on a mission trip in Flint, Michigan to help the community of Flint that has been facing an unprecedented water emergency. I was working with a company called Forge Flint.

It started to provide safe, clean water to the community of Flint.

Flint, Michigan where Aimee worked on community water relief

This summer I went to Flint, Michigan to help the community of Flint, that is facing an unprecedented water emergency

This trip gave me the opportunity to meet other students from distant places with diverse backgrounds, challenge me spiritually and develop my leadership skills. This time spent was an opportunity for growth, a place to practice communicating with people of different language backgrounds and interact with people of different points of view.

I carry on with that warrior spirit instilled in me by my parents and teachers.

I know how it feels to be humbled and grateful to those that have provided me the knowledge, strength, and will to persist. I am so excited for this next step and the opportunity to contribute in a learning community. And as I do so, I will be fulfilling my promise to my mother in our new home.

Northwest University, where Aimee is currently a student

I know how it feels to be humbled and grateful to those that provided me the knowledge, strength, and the will to persist

Through my studies I will be able to contribute to the ideas of a caseworker as I attempt to change the legacy of my people and family with a better life in the present and more importantly, for generations to come. I can truly make a difference in the community, and facilitate a better life for both the present generation, and for the future generations.

I have a warrior spirit instilled by my parents and teachers